The life of me

Maths mastery in The early years!

What’s the best way to learn addition and subtraction other than with real life objects?!

My class have really enjoyed adding pieces of fruit, comparing and sorting different sized buttons, counting magic beans and even different shaped pasta!l this year.

Counting real life objects is a must in the early years before moving into abstract concrete objects just as cubes.

Children will then be able to problem solve by turning the ‘real life object’ from a problem into cubes to work out their answer.

My Reception class have spent a lot of time this year counting different amounts onto 10 frames and exploring the part whole model. This has significantly increased their understanding of number.

For instance the 10 frames have enabled children to realise double facts and number bonds.

I can simply say:

What can you tell me about this number?

The children will come up with a range of responses such as:

8 and 2 make 10

4 and 4 make 8

1 and 1 make 2

8 is more than 2

2 is less than 8

The part part whole model has also helped children with their number bonds and understanding.

The children can explain different ways of making numbers up to 10 and some children now can automatically say the facts and use them in different problems – they have mastered it!!!

Introducing 10 frames, real life objects and part part whole models can really embed the essentials needed for children to reach great success in maths in year 1 and beyond.

Completing maths mastery means you allow time for the children to practise and you continue to review what is needed despite the curriculum content.

Would you rather continue to embed and practise the skills or just move on with children only gaining little knowledge of it anyway?

I am completing a masters dissertation this year all about the impact it can have on children in the Early Year’s, so keep posted!

The NCETM and maths hub also have a range of great resources that you can use for free too.

https://www.ncetm.org.uk/resources/52060

The bbc number blocks are also great and I will be separately blogging about that too. Keep an eye out on these little people!

#MissPinnock

The life of me

Jack and the beanstalk!

We’ve had a long term – (perhaps a little too long) of looking at the book Jack and the Beanstalk.

This has brought so much awe and wonder to the children.

First they found footprints, a giant shirt and giant boots!

What are these? Who do they belong to? Why are they here?

Later on they found the book wrapped up and they were all so excited to read it.

The giant sent the children a letter apologising for leaving all the mess and he gave them some ‘magic beans’ (sunflower seeds) to grow.

The children loved watching them grow and explored what happened when they watered them. They decided to bring them home on Mother’s Day, with their Mother’s Day card!

The giants footprints were used to measure and compare the children’s feet in provision. Children were inspired to work together to build a giants castle.

We used the forest school area to search for the giant, chanting the song: were going on a giant hunt were going to catch a big one were not scared… uh oh..

We used positional language to model obstacles in our way and to make decisions of how to get passed.

The children loved writing letters back to the giant and getting ready to post it!

Such a cross curricular activity – the fun never ends!

#jack and the beanstalk

#misspinnock

The life of me

The importance of play in in the early years!

As a trained nursery nurse and an early years specialised teacher I have strong views on child development and the best ways that children learn.

But I’m so shocked to see the views of many reception teachers that believe in formal type teaching for 4 year olds!

I think learning can be created in a play based way which is engaging and enriching for young children rather than children being pushed though a set of instructions sat at a table like a product on a conveyer belt!

I do feel like I’m on a bit of a rant with this rather than a blog post, but my passion for this is so strong!

I enjoy reading about the ways in which children learn and the provision teachers can plan for children to support this.

Play based learning can help children develop critical thinking, problem solving and social skills in self initiated activities with the teacher being the facilitator of this.

(Taken from the conversation).

Although research has provided that this is much more effective than adult led learning, it still isn’t looked upon as being as important in many schools?I personally think this is due to the demands of the curriculum and the pressure of the job. Teachers feel they have to get children to a certain point and the only way they can see them reach that point is through more adult input…

With the whole debate of a child’s ‘readiness’ for school it’s clear to see how teachers are pressurised into doing the opposite of what child development states.

I’m hoping one day this will change, as education is definitely not a one size fits all, and we should be creating a curriculum that fits in with the child rather than a curriculum that we try fit the child into.

I’d love to know your thoughts?

#MissPinnock